Basically, I started out in syndicated radio.  The company I worked for produced around 20 shows on hundreds of radio stations across the country, and one of them was called “Adam Curry’s Top 30 Hitlist.”  If you are 40+ years old, you’ll recall Adam as being an original MTV VJ.  Not only did Adam know music/broadcasting, but also he was a computer geek (I think he would consider that a compliment) and was one of my early influences in pushing into the Internet. I disclose this because I enjoyed reading Chris Phenner’s medi(a)muse email newsletter today titled Radio Radio.  It was nostalgic for me because it mentions Adam (who, btw, also invented podcasting) and Pandora (which he highlights used to be called The Music Genome Project, but also fwiw, before that used to be called Savage Beast) among other companies and topics I’ve closely followed over the years being a radio-turned-Internet guy and also having worked in the recommendation engine space. Regardless, here’s Chris’ article.  I hope you enjoy it as well but wanted to add that he asks why there isn’t a digital radio experience that lets you build “topic-based stations.”  Not positive I fully grok his question, but if so, I do believe this already exists, iHeartRadio Talk: Radio Radio   I shared an office 15 years ago with a woman with whom I had lunch this week. She showed me Napster for the first time.  She also showed me my first cost-per-click (CPC)  report from GoTo.com, which became Overture, and later was acquired by Yahoo. And explained that we only paid GoTo.com if someone actually clicked. Talk about an Aha. I stared blankly as I thought about what that meant. No cushy, second-price bids in this report – oh no – back then you paid the CPCs you bid for those clicks – and no opto. And forget dashboards. Reports were Excel. This was 1999. Search marketing has become less interesting – solid as it may be – Google keeps such a large share of spend margin. This Muse is about Radio. My friend started her career with WXRT, which she admitted she still listens to ‘in the car,’ she as she qualified it. Her husband has a podcast of which she is so proud. I asked with what tools he measures his audience. His tools do not sound helpful. YouTube fosters a helpful ecosystem, offering studio space and revenue-sharing to indie video creators who make video. Over 100 folks make $100k annually via YouTube. And those with 10k followers and 100k views access to studio space. But what about audio? Who has indie audio creators’ backs? This feels wide open. BlogTalkRadio came to mind, but my visit to the site says they want to be a destination way more than they want to help creators. Marco Arment was co-founder of Tumblr, he went on to make Instapaper, and sold that to Betaworks, profitable with millions of users. Marco’s next app will be Overcast, for podcasts. My sense is Marco will bring simplicity to the experience, but I am less sure he cares about podcast creators. iTunes announced One Billion podcaster subscribers in July 2013 across 250,000 unique titles. By those metrics, we are in a Golden Age of Audio. I worked at Audible.com in Q4 of 2004 when podcasting Hit, and wow did some folks freak about its potential impact. Napsterization of Spoken Word. Adam Curry – a former MTV VJ – raised $9mm for his firm Podcast Show from Kleiner Perkins and Sequoia Capital. Kleiner and Sequoia – in the same round! – crazy at the time. And Pandora shifted its model about this time from its being The Music Genome Project to what we know as Pandora – a consumer-facing streaming radio service. And 10 years later, nobody has a Native Audio Ad, which is odd. We have native text ads ('Sponsored Posts’), native display ads (FB & Twitter) and native video ads (Instagram, MixBit & Vine). Does Pandora lack the funding or the spine to create its own audio ad format? Eight seconds feels about right. Pandora should be 'FBX for Audio,’ which means they should be an audio ad exchange. Twitter gets the value of becoming a mobile inventory exchange, signaled through their $350mm acquisition of MoPub. Pop Quiz: If you have 45 minutes to commute with audio, which app do you use? Audible, iHeartRadio, Stitcher, Slacker and TuneIn are there, but none creates a custom collection of audio snippets. 'Pandora for audio’ feels needed, where you build your own spoken word content based on a topic or two. I would be down. The relationship we have with spoken word, some opine, goes back to when our mothers read to us as children. My 3.5 year-old son focuses on almost nothing, until you read a story. The blend of pages and pictures and voice lock his focus. And while many love their SONOS, I love the ability to hop around the terrestrial radio stations from where I’ve lived. From KFOG to WXRT to WEHN – radio’s warmth takes you right back. My former officemate – then within earshot – reminded me that so many love radio. And she sounded just the same. Thank you, Chris Endure past Muses: http://mediamuse.me

Basically, I started out in syndicated radio.  The company I worked for produced around 20 shows on hundreds of radio stations across the country, and one of them was called “Adam Curry’s Top 30 Hitlist.”  If you are 40+ years old, you’ll recall Adam as being an original MTV VJ.  Not only did Adam know music/broadcasting, but also he was a computer geek (I think he would consider that a compliment) and was one of my early influences in pushing into the Internet.

I disclose this because I enjoyed reading Chris Phenner’s medi(a)muse email newsletter today titled Radio Radio.  It was nostalgic for me because it mentions Adam (who, btw, also invented podcasting) and Pandora (which he highlights used to be called The Music Genome Project, but also fwiw, before that used to be called Savage Beast) among other companies and topics I’ve closely followed over the years being a radio-turned-Internet guy and also having worked in the recommendation engine space.

Regardless, here’s Chris’ article.  I hope you enjoy it as well but wanted to add that he asks why there isn’t a digital radio experience that lets you build “topic-based stations.”  Not positive I fully grok his question, but if so, I do believe this already exists, iHeartRadio Talk:

Radio Radio
 
I shared an office 15 years ago with a woman with whom I had lunch this week.

She showed me Napster for the first time. 

She also showed me my first cost-per-click (CPC)  report from GoTo.com, which became Overture, and later was acquired by Yahoo.

And explained that we only paid GoTo.com if someone actually clicked.

Talk about an Aha. I stared blankly as I thought about what that meant.

No cushy, second-price bids in this report – oh no – back then you paid the CPCs you bid for those clicks – and no opto.

And forget dashboards. Reports were Excel.

This was 1999.

Search marketing has become less interesting – solid as it may be – Google keeps such a large share of spend margin.

This Muse is about Radio.

My friend started her career with WXRT, which she admitted she still listens to ‘in the car,’ she as she qualified it.

Her husband has a podcast of which she is so proud. I asked with what tools he measures his audience.

His tools do not sound helpful.

YouTube fosters a helpful ecosystem, offering studio space and revenue-sharing to indie video creators who make video.

Over 100 folks make $100k annually via YouTube. And those with 10k followers and 100k views access to studio space.

But what about audio? Who has indie audio creators’ backs? This feels wide open.

BlogTalkRadio came to mind, but my visit to the site says they want to be a destination way more than they want to help creators.

Marco Arment was co-founder of Tumblr, he went on to make Instapaper, and sold that to Betaworks, profitable with millions of users.

Marco’s next app will be Overcast, for podcasts. My sense is Marco will bring simplicity to the experience, but I am less sure he cares about podcast creators.

iTunes announced One Billion podcaster subscribers in July 2013 across 250,000 unique titles. By those metrics, we are in a Golden Age of Audio.

I worked at Audible.com in Q4 of 2004 when podcasting Hit, and wow did some folks freak about its potential impact.

Napsterization of Spoken Word.

Adam Curry – a former MTV VJ – raised $9mm for his firm Podcast Show from Kleiner Perkins and Sequoia Capital.

Kleiner and Sequoia – in the same round! – crazy at the time.

And Pandora shifted its model about this time from its being The Music Genome Project to what we know as Pandora – a consumer-facing streaming radio service.

And 10 years later, nobody has a Native Audio Ad, which is odd.

We have native text ads ('Sponsored Posts’), native display ads (FB & Twitter) and native video ads (Instagram, MixBit & Vine).

Does Pandora lack the funding or the spine to create its own audio ad format?

Eight seconds feels about right.

Pandora should be 'FBX for Audio,’ which means they should be an audio ad exchange.

Twitter gets the value of becoming a mobile inventory exchange, signaled through their $350mm acquisition of MoPub.

Pop Quiz: If you have 45 minutes to commute with audio, which app do you use?

Audible, iHeartRadio, Stitcher, Slacker and TuneIn are there, but none creates a custom collection of audio snippets.

'Pandora for audio’ feels needed, where you build your own spoken word content based on a topic or two. I would be down.

The relationship we have with spoken word, some opine, goes back to when our mothers read to us as children.

My 3.5 year-old son focuses on almost nothing, until you read a story. The blend of pages and pictures and voice lock his focus.

And while many love their SONOS, I love the ability to hop around the terrestrial radio stations from where I’ve lived.

From KFOG to WXRT to WEHN – radio’s warmth takes you right back.

My former officemate – then within earshot – reminded me that so many love radio.

And she sounded just the same.

Thank you, Chris

Endure past Muses: http://mediamuse.me